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Discussion Forums » General Discussion
Currency
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5 Nov 2009, 20:01
~*Jodi*~
Post Count: 162
I like Brazil's money the best so far. Beautiful.
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5 Nov 2009, 22:17
international
Post Count: 200
Our animals conquer all, sweet! lol
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5 Nov 2009, 20:15
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
You have animals on your notes! So cool!
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6 Nov 2009, 01:43
Lauren.
Post Count: 885
WHY DO YOU GET SUCH PRETTY MONEY?! D:
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5 Nov 2009, 20:05
Doc
Post Count: 507
Cool forums thread is cool!
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5 Nov 2009, 20:08
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Scottish currency is the pound, just like English. And our coins are identical, although our notes are slightly different (but Scottish notes are accepted in England and vice versa. Except for the 1 note which is only accepted in Scotland)...

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There's not many 1 notes in circulation anymore. Which is a shame as I think they're quite cool (although I wouldn't want a purse full of them) but mostly just because the English don't have them. ;)
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5 Nov 2009, 20:15
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
That is our coins are identical to the English coins (not to each other). :P
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5 Nov 2009, 21:42
Acid Fairy
Post Count: 1849
A lot of people don't like accepting Scottish notes though!
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5 Nov 2009, 21:57
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
By law they HAVE to accept them (I have pointed this out to them before, and no English or Welsh store as ever refused to take my Scottish bank notes once I remind them of this). Just as here we have to accept English and Northern irish notes.
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5 Nov 2009, 22:23
Acid Fairy
Post Count: 1849
Oh yeah I know. I read somewhere that it actually isn't official legal tender outside Scotland however.
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5 Nov 2009, 22:24
Transit
Post Count: 1096
It is legal tender through out GB, so who ever wrote it was an idiot.
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5 Nov 2009, 22:34
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Actually, she's correct, although I didn't know it until now. Scottish bank notes are apparently not legal tender in Scotland OR England! However, shops in BOTH SHOULD accept them. Read more here:

English shops 'should accept Scottish money'
The Scotsman
Published Date: 21 January 2009
By DAVID GUNN


A BID to make shops in England take Scottish banknotes was launched today.
Conservative MP David Mundell said his private member's bill aimed to end the "confusion" among some businesses in England about the status of Scottish banknotes.

His Bill requires all providers of goods or services in the UK which accept Bank of England notes to accept Scottish banknotes on an equal basis.

Mr Mundell, shadow secretary of state for Scotland and MP for Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale, said today: "Many people, myself included, have tried to pay with Scottish banknotes in England, only to find them questioned. "This is exasperating". "And when a Scottish note is refused, that can even leave Scots in restaurants or petrol stations unable to pay for what they have bought."

Scottish banknotes are issued by three banks, the Royal Bank of Scotland, Bank of Scotland, and Clydesdale Bank, and nearly 3 billion worth of notes are in circulation. Mr Mundell plans to meet banks and other bodies over the next few weeks to finalise the wording of his Bill.

Scottish banknotes are legal tender in neither England nor Scotland but Tories said that for everyday transactions the term had little practical application.

And Mr Mundell's Bill will be framed to require outlets which accept Bank of England notes to accept Scottish notes on an equal footing, rather than trying to extend the definition of legal tender. The MP said: "It's time to end the confusion that exists amongst businesses in England about the status of Scottish notes. "It's also time to end the situation whereby English visitors to my constituency in the south and to other parts of Scotland feel obliged to keep asking for English notes in their change so that they don't have to take Scottish notes back over the border.

"It is time that the law made clear what we Scots already know that a Scottish fiver or tenner is worth just as much as an English one."

It means that if a debtor pays in legal tender, they cannot be sued for non-payment.

"It does not mean that any ordinary transaction has to take place in legal tender, according to the Royal Mint website.

Scottish and Northern Irish notes are not legal tender.

Bank of England notes are legal tender but only in England and Wales
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5 Nov 2009, 23:02
Acid Fairy
Post Count: 1849
Mwahahaha knew it ;D
I do have the most amazing hoard of pointless shit stored in my brain!
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5 Nov 2009, 22:36
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
It's not official tender inside Scotland either! See my reply to Transit.

The key lies in the definition of 'legal tender' and the fact it is being abused by English shops (although like I say, I often use Scottish notes in English and Welsh shops without problem).
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5 Nov 2009, 22:19
international
Post Count: 200
I did not know that about the coins.... weird, but cool I guess.

And I find it so odd when other countries accept currencies from other country! Well, mainly Canada accepting American money... too weird for me. Although if you have the same coins I guess it kinda makes sense.... Are they worth the same though?
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5 Nov 2009, 22:28
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
It's not the same as the US and Canada, because unlike the US and Canada, the WHOLE of the UK (Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland) have the same BRITISH currency, the pound stirling (because technically we're one country made up of four individual nations). It's just that the notes produced by Scottish banks look different to the notes produced by banks in England & Wales (and different again to the Northern Irish notes). The coins are the same. So any British note can be spent in any British nation because it's the same currency. And so yes, since they're the same currency, they are worth the same.

That said, the Euro is a good example of currency which can be spent in multiple countries, since it is used by many European countries (France, Spain, Portugal, Germany to name a few). The Republic of Ireland however, not being part of the UK, also uses the Euro (although they used to use the pound, same as us, and at that time, Irish pounds were the same currency as British pounds).

The American dollar is different currency to the Canadian dollar, so that's a different situation.

Wait, didn't you live in the UK for a while? Surely you didn't think Scotland had a different currency to England while you were living here?
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5 Nov 2009, 22:37
international
Post Count: 200
That's what I figure, they're the same currency, just different "images" on the money. This is quite interesting... especially when you think about other countries that have the same currency, but for example, different coins for different states. (I mean, it's usually the coin that changes and the bills are the same.)

Now I find it extremely odd that some people refuse to accept your money. lol

The Euro is a different example to what I was talking about though, because it's the only currency in those different countries and was created with the purpose of being used in the different countries. American money is american, I find it odd that it's accepted anywhere in Canada. Especially when it's a different currency of different value.

I lived in England when I was young. What the heck do I remember about the other parts of the UK and currency at that age? lol Especially when I went to an american school so the currency I do remember learning as a child (though maybe this was in another country, i can't even remember) was the american one! Dimes = 10, Quarters = 25! Etc... lol To be honest I just never really thought about the currency around other parts of the UK. I probably kindof assumed it was all pounds... but I never really stopped to think about the fact that the bills would be different.
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5 Nov 2009, 22:38
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Lol. I never thought about the fact that since you went to an American school you would have learned about American money. How strange when you couldn't actually SPEND any American money!
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5 Nov 2009, 22:46
international
Post Count: 200
Well now this was an american school, and while it was filled with international students the purpose (and name) of the school was to teach american children, wherever they are living. Don't you think it's important that american students living, let's say in France should learn about the money in their own country? Just because they are living in France at the time doesn't mean they will live there forever. Especially if they are in that american school, which suggests that their stay in France is either temporary, or that their entire family is american.

I honestly don't specifically remember learning about the currency of the country I was living in, but it was never really much of an issue because I was surrounded by that currency so I obviously knew how it worked (at least).

And a side comment is that really american money is probably one of, if not the most important currencies in the world.
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5 Nov 2009, 23:23
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Fair point.
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5 Nov 2009, 22:40
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Sorry, I think I misunderstood your original post. When you said you found it strange that different countries accepted other countries currency I thought you were talking about England and Scotland (who actually have the same currency).
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5 Nov 2009, 22:47
international
Post Count: 200
Well, I honestly did not know whether it was the same currency at the time, that's why I asked you.

My comment about Canada accepting american money was really just a side note that your post made me think of which I thought applied to the forum topic.
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5 Nov 2009, 23:06
Acid Fairy
Post Count: 1849
Quite a few shops in the UK will accept Euros now too.
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5 Nov 2009, 23:15
international
Post Count: 200
Oooh, that's interesting. I did not know that either! Hmm... That's kinda like the Canadians accepting american money only for some reason it makes a little more sense to me just because it's a currency that was created for various European countries. Now, how do they accept it, like as if it were the same value or is there some transfer rate applied? I'm not even sure how many Euros is worth how many Pounds these days...? (I hope that made sense.)
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5 Nov 2009, 23:27
Acid Fairy
Post Count: 1849
I'm not sure but I know some shops give the price in Euros as well as pounds. I found this that you may find interesting: BBC article.

It mentions Gatecrasher in Birmingham and I've been there a few times so that's very handy to know!
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