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Discussion Forums » General Discussion
calling on all the girls (or guys) that likes 2
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9 Jun 2009, 13:16
lithium layouts.
Post Count: 836
Funny isn't it, how society's concept of beauty changes with the years. in the 19th century it was all about being perfectly pale, because any hint of a tan meant you belonged to the working class, who spent all their days outdoors working in the sun. And now, obviously, tan is in, and has been for some time. But I reckon it's on its way out, and pale will make a comeback. xD
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12 Jun 2009, 18:32
Lauren.
Post Count: 885
Haha, I never thought of it that way. Pale will make a comeback, I feel it in my very pale skin!!
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7 Jun 2009, 05:08
.xoxo
Post Count: 263
I think people should stop being drama llama's and get over it. I tan sometimes and I don't see a big deal. I know of the risks, and I make my own decisions. I like to tan cause it relaxes me, and makes my skin better (As in acne and such, not with skin cancer.) There is a risk for driving a car, and breathing in the fumes from the car exhaust from the person idling in front of you. I also drink cause it relaxes me but it also puts me at risk for damaging my liver, and throat a mouth cancer. I know of the risks, but if everyone was scared of the what if's of life then they should stay in a plastic bubble. Although, that could give them cancer if they inhaled something toxic from the plastic...
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7 Jun 2009, 10:31
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
I feel like I'm repeating myself here...

The risk from driving a car is NOT the same thing, because driving a car is a necessity for many people to go about their daily business. A tan is NOT a necessity.

And alcohol will only damage your liver or cause throat cancer if you drink HUGE amounts on a daily basis for a prolonged period of time. Drinking occassionally (even drinking heavily at weekends) does NOT cause cancer or liver cirrhosis.

Similarly, you are highly unlikely to experience any ill effects just from breathing in a few car fumes for a few seconds at lights!

These things are NOT the same as the risk of using a sunbed. If you use a sunbed you are putting yourself at an unneccessary, significantly increased, risk of skin cancer.

Why do people not get this?? It's not about avoiding ALL risks. It's avoiding things which are a HIGH risk and which are UNNECCESSARY risks. Sunbeds are high risk, and are an unneccessary risk. So far no-one ha given any other examples of activities which fulfill this criteria.

I do however, respect your use of sunbeds as treatment for acne. In that case you are getting health benefits for it, so it is slightly different. To you, the benefits to your acne perhaps outweigh your risk of skin cancer. I don't think the same can be said for people using sunbeds purely for cosmetic reasons.

Your last sentence did make me laugh though (and for the record I am in no way suggesting people try and live within a plastic bubble... just be sensible and respectful of their bodies).
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7 Jun 2009, 05:08
.xoxo
Post Count: 263
I think people should stop being drama llamas and get over it. I tan sometimes and I don't see a big deal. I know of the risks, and I make my own decisions. I like to tan cause it relaxes me, and makes my skin better (As in acne and such, not with skin cancer.) There is a risk for driving a car, and breathing in the fumes from the car exhaust from the person idling in front of you. I also drink cause it relaxes me but it also puts me at risk for damaging my liver, and throat a mouth cancer. I know of the risks, but if everyone was scared of the what if's of life then they should stay in a plastic bubble. Although, that could give them cancer if they inhaled something toxic from the plastic...
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7 Jun 2009, 05:09
.xoxo
Post Count: 263
Why did it post twice with one of the llamas having an apostrophe? Hmm...
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7 Jun 2009, 10:32
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Perhaps the forums now correct grammar too. Lol.
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8 Jun 2009, 14:20
queenbutterfly
Post Count: 425
I personally think this thread was a waste of time. Every person has their preferences. Either you think tanning is OK or you don't. Trying to convince someone not to do it or putting them down for what they choose is not helping anyone.
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9 Jun 2009, 05:39
Colt
Post Count: 3
Bwahahahahahahahahahaha..
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9 Jun 2009, 06:23
& skull.
Post Count: 1701
here's some skin cancer ads that get played down in aus.

WARNING, THE FIRST AD IS GRAPHIC AND OF SURGERY. SQUEAMISH ARE ADVISED NOT TO WATCH

melanoma removal
killer body art

here's another video about skin cancer, and tanning beds. bit long, but yeah. her biggest aim in life was to get to her 26th birthday.
clare oliver advice on tanning
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9 Jun 2009, 06:33
& skull.
Post Count: 1701
dying for a tan
fuck me, one kid got skin cancer at 16. i don't understand why people think they're invincible.
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9 Jun 2009, 06:40
& skull.
Post Count: 1701
oh that's a bit graphic too. around the 8 minute mark there's some surgery.
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12 Jun 2009, 18:39
Lauren.
Post Count: 885
I'm glad you posted those. It's extremely scary as a thought, but to see those people talking about their soon coming deaths, it's so surreal.
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9 Jun 2009, 15:01
mixie
Post Count: 196
I watched those first two ads.... GROSS!!! Yet cool XD
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9 Jun 2009, 22:37
lithium layouts.
Post Count: 836
I remember Clare Oliver =(
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9 Jun 2009, 21:05
crazybeautiful;
Post Count: 56
woww. honestly who cares if someone tans or not. i tan. big FREAKING deal. live life how you want
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9 Jun 2009, 21:10
[mandie knickers]
Post Count: 157
dramaramamamaz.

brilliant, yo.

nikky, ev...i love you guys. ;D
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10 Jun 2009, 00:16
love♥nik
Post Count: 1010
Laughing at drama llamas just make the llamas angrier and spit. XD
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9 Jun 2009, 21:22
[mandie knickers]
Post Count: 157
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9 Jun 2009, 23:59
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Haha. Brilliant.
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10 Jun 2009, 04:02
valerieeeee
Post Count: 274
tanning might make you look pretty now, but probably when you're older, your skin will look all leathery and gross like a baseball glove. and that's not attractive.
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10 Jun 2009, 15:06
~*Jodi*~
Post Count: 162
There are pros and cons to everything that we do, and risks for everything. People are allowed to make their own choices. Even though there is a higher risk of skin cancer in sunbeds, there are also some benefits to sunlight as well. Informed people can make their own decisions, and I think the problem is when people over-expose themselves, not when they do it occassionally. Even if you burn once a year, say on a trip to the beach, then in 50 years you've burned 50 times and that alone is going to increase your risk for skin cancer. But who, especially Americans, are going to go to the beach, stay fully clothed, and not get any sunlight just to protect themselves from the sun so that they don't get burned? It's all about moderation.

But there are also benefits to sunlight, and since the risks have been clearly laid out... Here are some benefits:

The ultraviolet rays are antiseptic and are capable of killing bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeasts, molds, and mites in air and water, and on surfaces. Ultraviolet light also kills germs on our skin. This makes sunbathing a useful treatment for many skin diseases, such as diaper rash, athlete's foot, psoriasis, acne, boils, or impetigo.

Sunlight also toughens and thickens the skin, making it less susceptible to injury and infection. Regular, controlled, moderate exposure to sunlight, instead of damaging the skin and aging it, actually protects the skin by building up a natural resistance to the harmful effects of ultraviolet light, while giving it a nice velvety texture. Later on we will discuss some precautions, but first, more benefits.

Ultraviolet light converts cholesterol in the skin to vitamin D. This vitamin is essential for the proper handling of calcium in the body and thus in the prevention of rickets and adult osteomalacia. Getting out in the sun, therefore, is a good way to lower cholesterol levels in our bodies. If we expose six square inches of our skin to direct sunlight for one hour per day, we will obtain our minimum daily requirement for vitamin D.

Sunlight helps to regulate almost all our bodily processes. Starting from our minds and working down, sunlight has been shown to increase our sense of well-being and to improve sleep. Ultraviolet light coming into our eyes stimulates the pineal gland, which helps to regulate our activity cycles.

Thyroid function may improve. Hormone imbalances tend to level out.

Resting heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration rates are all decreased after a sunbath. This result is especially true if any of them were high to begin with. Blood sugar levels can be stabilized, although Diabetics must use extra caution in the sun, as they are at greater risk of permanent injury from sunburn.

Sunlight stimulates the production of more red blood cells, increasing the oxygen content of the blood, and thus increasing muscular endurance. It also stimulates production of more white blood cells and enhances oxygen utilization, which helps the body maintain its defense against disease. While certain skin cancers are associated with exposure to sunlight, the incidence of some of the more serious internal cancers seems to decrease.

Appetite may be improved, along with our assimilation, elimination, and metabolic processes. Poisonous chemicals and heavy metals are removed from the bloodstream faster, while levels of healthy trace minerals are actually increased in the blood. Muscular strength has been increased, even in those unable to exercise. Sunlight has even been found helpful in the treatment of stomach ulcers.

It is known to help improve moods in people, such as those who suffer from what's called the "winter blues" from the weather being "gray" all the time, which they say, comes from lack of sunlight.

There are risks and benefits, and people should think about it all and then make the decision for themselves, and shouldn't be hounded about what they choose to do. Not everyone has to understand or agree with everything that someone else does in their lives.
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10 Jun 2009, 15:19
~*Jodi*~
Post Count: 162
I forgot to put some links where information can be found and where this was pulled from:

http://www.projectrestore.com/library/health/sunlight.htm

http://www.ehponline.org/members/2008/116-4/focus.html

http://www.ehponline.org/members/2008/116-4/focus.html#sun

http://www.who.int/uv/en/

Or anyone can do a search on it. You can look up either benefits or risks to sunlight.

It's all about moderation.
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10 Jun 2009, 18:47
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
I'm a bit unsure about where the first website you've used gets it's sources. It doesn't appear to be a medical website (in fact it looks like a religious one), and it doesn't provide any references even although it gives rather concerning advice like Chemical sunscreens applied to the skin may also be used. They are not necessary when sunbathing, and neither are creams or oils.

ANY medical professional would advise that sunscreens should always be worn when sunbathing.

I also find it interesting that that website says NOTHING at all about the risk of skin cancer from sunbed use. This would certainly not be a website I would advise anyone to take medical advice from. There's far more reliable websites out there which provide much more complete and correct information on the matter.

Your other two websites seem OK (especially the WHO one which is very good). But i don't see anywhere in either of them that suggests using sunbeds is safe. In fact the WHO site clearly says Small amounts of UV are essential for the production of vitamin D in people, yet overexposure may result in acute and chronic health effects on the skin, eye and immune system.

In fact, the WHO website gives the following advice:

- Limit time in the midday sun. The sunís UV rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. To the extent possible, limit exposure to the sun during these hours.
- Watch for the UV index. This important resource helps you plan your outdoor activities in ways that prevent overexposure to the sunís rays. While you should always take precautions against overexposure, take special care to adopt sun safety practices when the UV Index predicts exposure levels of moderate or above.
- Use shade wisely
- Seek shade when UV rays are the most intense, but keep in mind that shade structures such as trees, umbrellas or canopies do not offer complete sun protection. Remember the shadow rule: "Watch your shadow Ė Short shadow, seek shade!"
- Wear protective clothing
- A hat with a wide brim offers good sun protection for your eyes, ears, face, and the back or your neck. Sunglasses that provide 99 to 100 percent UV-A and UV-B protection will greatly reduce eye damage from sun exposure. Tightly woven, loose fitting clothes will provide additional protection from the sun.
Use sunscreen
- Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen of SPF 15+ liberally and re-apply every two hours, or after working, swimming, playing or exercising outdoors.
- Avoid sunlamps and tanning parlours Sunbeds damage the skin and unprotected eyes and are best avoided entirely.

The WHO make quite clear (in their Sunbed Guidance document) that they consider the risks of using a sunbed to be high. They also advise that therapeutic use of sunbeds for medical conditions (such as psoriasis, eczema, acne) be conducted only in a medical unit under supervision.
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10 Jun 2009, 18:19
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
I don't think anyone is denying that there are benefits from sun exposure. Nor is anyone suggesting that people cover themselves from head to toe in SPF 50 everytime they go outside.

Like you said yourself, it's about moderation. The sun is great for the body in moderation. But laying in the sun all day with no sunscreen (or sunscreen with an SPF less than 15) is not moderation. It is excess. Sunbeds deliver 10 times the strength of UV radiation as the sun does. So sunbeds are not moderation. They are excess. And that is why they are so dangerous.
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