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Discussion Forums » General Discussion
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Tipping
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5 Oct 2011, 20:40
Chris
Post Count: 1938
I don't tip unless the service is particularly good, knowing that most other people don't feel the same way. I know that other people will tip, and so my personal contribution won't make a difference.

I envy my waiter friends who come home with $150 a night, plus their bi-weekly paycheck, and I resent those who complain about individual customers who don't tip when they're still making money off of others.
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6 Oct 2011, 05:15
Jessica
Post Count: 283
I usually always leave something for a tip. Unless the service is extremely shitty... Like if the only time I saw my waitress is when she took my order, and afterwards everyone else brought us food/got us things. (which happened at Olive Garden the other night. I wound up walking up to the OTHER gal who brought us everything and handing her a tip. I don't think it's fair for someone else to get money when they didn't do the work.)

But I don't think it's fair for you to say that you don't tip because others will.
What if your boss didn't pay you for an hour you worked - because you were getting paid for the OTHER hours you were working? Would that hour really make a difference?

I think if people put in work, they deserve to be compensated for it. I certainly wouldn't enjoy working for free.
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6 Oct 2011, 08:08
Chris
Post Count: 1938
@Jellyka: I don't see anything particularly unfair about it. Like, I know others are going to tip, and it's not going to make any kind of considerable difference unless I'm a part of a large party, or at least a large bill (in which case I WOULD tip unless the service is a shit sandwich). The analogy doesn't really stick because I'm not required to pay them for their service, whereas the boss is. Their boss isn't legally allowed to cut down hours.

Out of curiosity, what are the laws about tipping in WI? I know that, in Florida, if the employee doesn't make minimum wage in combined tips and paychecks, the employer is required to make up the difference.
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6 Oct 2011, 14:46
Jessica
Post Count: 283
@Anonyyyy: Personally, I think it's pretty crap to not tip. But I guess that's just me. As for Wisconsaaaan:

Tipped employees over 20 years, and employees age 14-19 after 90 days of opportunity wage has passed.
$2.33/hour (base wages for general minimum wage)
+ $4.92/hour (tip credit)
-----------------
$7.25/hour

New hires under age 20 (14-19 year olds during the first 90 calendar days on the job with opportunity wage)
$2.13/hour (base wages for opportunity wage)
+ $3.77/hour (tip credit)
------------------
$5.90/hour


The federal cash wage for tipped employees is $2.13. Wisconsinís rate of $2.33 is higher and therefore more favorable for the employee and is the rate that should be used.

If over a full pay period, an employee does not receive enough money in tips plus actual base wages to bring him or her up to the full minimum wage, the employer must increase the base wages to make up the difference.

Le Source.PDF
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6 Oct 2011, 13:55
starsmaycollide
Post Count: 408
Have you told your waiter friends this? And while $150 a night sounds great, I'd be surprised if that is typical. Even if it was, you'd have to factor in the nights they go in and don't make hardly anything. Also, I'd want to know how much that biweekly paycheck is, before I'd envy them.

In my experience, the work is really challenging, stressful, and people in public generally treated us like garbage on a regular basis. I was a hostess and not a server, but when I was in that job-it was rare if someone came out with over 100 a night. Some nights they would come in and get barely any tables.

Every time there is a thread about tipping here on bloop, someone always says they shouldn't have to (and I realize there are cultural differences, so Ia m referring to the US and typical practices here.). But seriously, I dare anybody to do that job and be okay with it if you serve a table, they pay their bill, and leave you nothing. I don't blame them at all for being bothered by it. For them, whether you agree or not, it's like a slap in the face.

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6 Oct 2011, 04:54
Beautiful Lies
Post Count: 402
well when your bi weekly paycheck is $200, you probably need some tip money. My server friend makes 2.50 an hour. That's IT. She brings home $200 each paycheck BEFORE taxes. That shit sucks. If I made $2.50 an hour I'd probably be pissed if someone didn't tip for good service. Kind of like how I get cranky when I spend 3 hours on coloring someones hair and they look amazing when they leave...and they give me a dollar. Kinda sucks.
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6 Oct 2011, 09:05
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
@Beautiful lies: Here tipping hairdressers just isn't done. It's pretty much standard to tip waiters/waitresses about 10% (and I do unless the service is bad. I don't tip for bad service) but we don't tip bar staff, hairdressers/beauticians and rarely taxi drivers (though I sometimes tell them to keep the change). But minimum wage here is also higher than in America.
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6 Oct 2011, 14:52
Jessica
Post Count: 283
@RedFraggle: I'm curious - how much is minimum wage over there?
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6 Oct 2011, 16:19
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
If aged over 21 £6.08 (US$9.35)
If aged 18-20 £4.98 ($7.66)
If aged 16-17 £3.68 ($5.66)
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6 Oct 2011, 16:43
Jessica
Post Count: 283
$9.35?? Geeze, wouldn't that be lovely here! :(
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6 Oct 2011, 17:02
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
See, that is why tipping is not so essential here. I still tip waiters and waitresses if the service is good, but 10% is standard here (not the 15-20% that is standard in the US. Though when I've been in America I've always tipped in accordance with that).
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6 Oct 2011, 16:55
Beautiful Lies
Post Count: 402
Fair enough. Do you know how Stylists are paid over there? I would NEVER expect to be tipped at my job because I'm making (crappy) money. However Stylists over here can be paid in a few different ways, depending on where you work.

A. Some salons just charge booth rent (either weekly or monthly) and the stylist is left to determine how much to charge clients for services. B. Some salons pay stylists a set hourly wage and they can supplement with tips and C. Some salon's have a set price for services and the Stylist gets a percentage of that wage (Commission). Options A and C are what happen most often. So, if I work at XYZ salon and XYZ says that haircuts are $25. I don't get $25 dollars for my haircut. I get like a percentage of that $25. Most places you can't get more than 50% commission. So when I do a $25 haircut I get a whopping $12.50. Of course that's if I'm a lead stylist. I believe a lot of places when you start you get about 30% commission and you have to work your way up. So that $25 haircut gets me $7.50.

So it kind of sucks. However there is the potential to make a LOT of money that way.
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6 Oct 2011, 17:04
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
@Beautiful Lies: No, I don't have a clue how stylists are paid here. But no-one really tips them. It's just not what we do. I suspect they probably get paid more than American stylists though.
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6 Oct 2011, 18:52
Transit
Post Count: 1096
@Beautiful lies

Most salons work on an hourly wage here, almost all salons have a set price list, but this still depends on skill, like I go to the head stylist at my hair dresser and she costs more, but she is also paid a greater hourly wage. At my hair dressers a haircut takes 45 minutes, so $12.50 for 45 minutes work is very good.
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7 Oct 2011, 04:21
Beautiful Lies
Post Count: 402
Of course $12.50 for 45 minutes of work is good. No one can live off that though (here in A-merricah that is). Also that's only if I'm making 50% commission on a $25 cut. What if I'm only making $7.50 per haircut? You can only be scheduled for a maximum of 10 cuts a day (depending on time restrictions, usually haircuts are booked for an hour). So you make $75 and how much of that goes to taxes? Sucks balls. That's why tipping helps. Minimum wage here is also $7.50 and no one can really live off that. I make more than minimum wage and can barely afford to live.

There is a lot of work that goes into being a Stylist and getting $7.50 for a haircut BLOWS when I know my work is worth more than that. It's not an easy job, but some people seem to think it is.
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6 Oct 2011, 07:21
~Aiure
Post Count: 118
I tip at least 10%, unless service is absolutely horrible. This includes food quality and timing, not just how the server treats me. Though there was one time when I tipped my server A LOT despite waiting over almost two hours for my meal. He was incredibly nice and accomodating despite having to run around like a headless chicken on a night where the restaurant was absolutely packed and understaffed.

Local servers are paid under minimum wage because of the extra income they get from tips. I'm on the fence about the whole deal, really. It works, theoretically. But many local restaurants split their tips between the servers and kitchen staff, so kitchen staff get well above minimum wage + tips, and servers just get shafted.
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6 Oct 2011, 08:09
Chris
Post Count: 1938
~Aiure: I was saying the same thing to Jellyka -- do you know the laws of tipping in your state? I thought it was a pretty standard thing that employers are required to make up the difference if the server's combined wages don't add up to minimum wage.
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6 Oct 2011, 18:58
~Aiure
Post Count: 118
@Anonymous Source: The law permitting servers to receive under minimum wage in my province is only five months old. From what I gather, employers aren't required to make up the difference. I'd have to do some digging to get the truth though, since it doesn't seem to be common enough to warrant a prominent law.
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6 Oct 2011, 10:58
Transit
Post Count: 1096
I very rarely tip, and I would certainly only tip a waiter/waitress, but that would be if the service was very good, I would never tip just for standard or bad service, waiters/waitresses should have to earn their tips.

I do find it quite egotistical that someone people expect a tip for actually doing their job and to a standard level, not an exceptional lvevel and then complain/moan that they don't believe they have received enough, especially as most people who are after tips are in a fairly unskilled area, so while they may have been polite etc they aren't exactly doing anything challenging or greatly beneficial for their customer.
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6 Oct 2011, 14:20
Madeline Rain
Post Count: 151
I ALWAYS tip 20% to my hairdresser, waiting staff, taxi drivers and delivery people, unless the service is shitty, in which case I go out of my way to make sure I get every single penny back in change. I think not tipping in the U.S. is of poor taste, and hiding behind the pool of people who DO tip is shady. If you can't afford the extra 15%-20%, you have no business eating at that restaurant/taking that cab/getting your hair done.


Of course, there are cultural differences, and in other countries it's not customary to tip, and sometimes people even get offended by it. This happened to me not too long ago when I tried to tip a tour operator in the South Pacific, and I had to apologize deeply for offering him a tip.
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6 Oct 2011, 14:50
Jessica
Post Count: 283
@Madeline Rain: "I think not tipping in the U.S. is of poor taste, and hiding behind the pool of people who DO tip is shady. If you can't afford the extra 15%-20%, you have no business eating at that restaurant/taking that cab/getting your hair done."

I completely agree!
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6 Oct 2011, 20:49
Winged Centaur
Post Count: 301
I would like to take this opportunity to inform the general public of Bloop that many curb-side takeaway persons make the exact same as a service, for example 2.13 an hour.

WE ARE NOT MCDONALDS. YOU SHOULD TIP. AND WE WORK HARDER THAN SERVERS BECAUSE THERE IS NO LIMIT ON HOW MANY ORDERS (TABLES) WE GET. We also are expected to assist the servers, by running food, drinks, etc.

Also, many dining restaurants have a thing called TIPSHARE, in which servers pay a certain percentage (for me, 3%) of their total sales into a pool of money that is redistributed to hostesses and bussers, for example. If you do not tip your server, THAT MONEY COMES OUT OF THEIR POCKET.

These things do vary among different establishments, but both of those things are common. Tip your to-go person, tip your server.

Both of those jobs require you to be on your feet for long hours, carry heavy trays of food and drinks, have order accuracy, a high level of customer service. It IS a job that can be well done and should be well done, but I would not call it "easy." I would call it a job, just like any other job. It is a service industry, and tipping is expected, and I think deserved. A good server really cares about the quality of your evening and does everything to ensure you have a good time. Not every server is a good server, and blatant bad service should be penalized.

Whatever your opinions about the "system" on tipping the service industry, remember that the person you are about to stiff is a person with bills and responsibilities and not tipping could mean the difference between having rent paid or not. It was really painful during the summer working in to-go and having our livelihood depend on people who think I'm not suppose to be tipped because I'm in to-go, getting stiffed on the majority of my orders, when I rarely made a mistake and treated people really well (for example, giving free to-go drinks for anyone waiting on an order, even if they were early).

Attitudes like "Someone else will tip" is what made me less than minimum wage last week (in to-go). And it's bullshit.
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7 Oct 2011, 03:48
Chris
Post Count: 1938
Winged Centaur: In Florida, the employer is required to make up the difference if the employee doesn't make minimum wage for the week in combined wages.
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7 Oct 2011, 04:08
Winged Centaur
Post Count: 301
The same is for my state. I will make minimum wage for the week. But I worked harder than that.

I guess the problem is you think we should only make minimum wage. And I don't agree with that. I have worked minimum wage jobs, and I work much harder in to-go. I work in all weather conditions. When it is raining and snowing, I still bring food to the car. Even when it's raining so hard that even single article of my clothing is soaking wet, including my socks and underwear. I work with customers who show up 15 minutes early and yell at me because their food isn't ready, all with a smile.

Serving is not a minimum wage job. It's an industry where people cater to your wants and needs. It is not McDonald's. And despite it's problems, it's the system we have, and it's the system people like me depend on to pay their bills.

It is suppose to be a system where good service is rewarded and bad service is penalized. There are even standards of tipping for each type of service. 10% for standard service, 15% for excellent service, and your choice is the service is especially horrible.

The work I do is worth more than minimum wage.
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8 Oct 2011, 09:30
Estella
Post Count: 1779
@ winged centaur: But then that is the same for a lot of mininum wage jobs. Generally minimum wage jobs are bloody hard work and thankless, and worth more than minimum wage. Like working in care homes, where you're rushing around, doing hard physical work, caring for, say, elderly people, some of whom are dying, taking them to the toilet, wiping their bottoms, getting poop thrown at you sometimes, if they have dementia, dealing with bodily fluids, etc. And care workers don't get tipped at all, no matter how outstanding their performance. You're not allowed to take money from patients even if they gave it, because obciously they're vulnerable and staff could potentially abuse this. But society doesn't value this work as above minimum wage. Society just sees them as 'angel' type people who are so good and caring that they don't care about money. So it's quite random the min wage jobs you can get tipped for and those you can't or don't.
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