Search
Not Logged In
0
Your Username:
Your Password:

[ sign up | recover ]

Discussion Forums » General Discussion
Page:  1  2 
birth control
0 likes [|reply]
2 Mar 2010, 23:37
being human.
Post Count: 52
i am having problems with my birth control. i am going to call my doctor again and tell them to switch my pill to a lower dose because my body is going crazy right now. i'm getting headaches randomly, light headed, i'm extremely moody, and i don't feel right when i take the active pills. when i am on my fake pills, i feel normal and just have the normal period feeling. i was wondering what is a good low dosage pill you would recommend?
0 likes [|reply]
2 Mar 2010, 23:46
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
Do NOT ask these questions on Bloop. Ask your doctor. You don't even know that a 'low dosage' pill is what you need. Different pills suit different people. Personal recommendations are pointless. You need to ask your doctor if you can try a different one and he/she will recommend one.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 00:18
Mary Magdelene
Post Count: 506
She can't get them without her Dr anyway, so what's the harm in asking about other people's experiences with different pills? Then she can have a list of other options she can discuss with her Dr. I can tell you from personal experience, if she just goes in to her Dr and asks, "Is there something else you can put me on instead of this one because this is how I feel on this one," her Dr may very well say, "Like what?" or "Do you have any specific ones you'd like to ask about?"

So since she can't just go get it on her own, and because she needs her Dr in order to GET the pill, there is absolutely no harm whatsoever in her asking for other people's experiences. Some Drs may not like it when the patient does their own research and has specific questions about specific medications, but some Drs do like it when their patient comes in prepared with specific questions or possible ideas so they can discuss it with their patient.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 00:59
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
But different people have different experiences with different pills. One person might tell her they had a horrible experience with a particular pill, and that may turn out to be the one that works best for her. So other peoples experiences are not helpful in this situation.

And I've never met a doctor who's first question to a patient would be to ask them what medication THEY want. But I think that is because prescribing culture is very different in the UK. For example here drug companies are not allowed to advertise to the public on TV etc. They can only advertise in medical journals. And quite rightly so. A person can't possibly know what medication is best for them by seeing an advert for it. Usually the doctor is far better qualified to decide which medication is best (as they are aware of the actual evidence for effectiveness of that particular drug as well as of it's adverse effects).

That's not to say British doctors won't happily discuss a particular medication if a patient asks about it, but they don't generally ask the patient what they want as a first question.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 01:49
HorrorVixen XO
Post Count: 869
thats very true, red. i was on the depo shot and out of all my friends, i had the worse reaction. i was moody and had weight gain. my friends didnt gain any weight and were naturally bitchy =D
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 01:55
Mary Magdelene
Post Count: 506
And I've never met a doctor who's first question to a patient would be to ask them what medication THEY want

And THAT is not what I said. If she gets ideas and opinions from others, makes a list of them and takes them to her Dr and say, "I've heard about these, what do you think about them?" that opens up the line of communication between the Dr and the patient and the Dr can tell the patient, "Well, here's what I think about that option and your particular situation."

Yes, the Dr is FAR better qualified to determine what is best for their patient than the patient is. But that does NOT mean someone can't look things up, look into other medications, take them to their Dr and discuss the options with their Dr, especially if they are like the OP and question their Dr's choice. And since the patient can't (legally) get the medication without their Dr anyway, there is absolutely no harm in someone asking, "What medication are you on for this issue and how does it affect you?" and writing it down to talk to a Dr about. What's the worst that could happen? The patient could realize the Dr really does have their best interests in mind when prescribing medication. And at the very least, it opens up a good line of communication between the patient and the Dr.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 12:57
being human.
Post Count: 52
the first time i went to my doctor to be put on the pill, she asked me what bitch control i had in mind and why.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 21:52
xoxo♥
Post Count: 160
hehe you said *bitch* control lol ;) Sorry had to make light of the situation.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 22:02
being human.
Post Count: 52
haha opps!
0 likes [|reply]
5 Mar 2010, 06:18
& skull.
Post Count: 1701
lmao best typo ever. i know there'd be guy friends of mine that'd call it that ;D
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 13:05
being human.
Post Count: 52
i don't see anything wrong with me asking about this on here. some other person asked other bloopers experience and opinions about their birth control on here for a different situation. i know your a doctor but you shouldn't jump down my throat. it's not like i can go get birth control off the street and start trying many different kinds at once. i may be 20 years old, but i'm not stupid.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 18:22
Beautiful Lies
Post Count: 402
I've actually never had a doctor ask me what kind of birth control I'd like. Any time I wanted to switch (all of twice) I would tell her why and any concerns I'd have with a new medication (for example the last time I switched I said it HAS to have a generic or I can't afford it) and SHE was the one who told me what might be a good medication for me. I've never heard of the medication she prescribed but she was spot on. My doctor = awesome.
0 likes [|reply]
5 Mar 2010, 08:33
The Ryan
Post Count: 414
"A person can't possibly know what medication is best for them by seeing an advert for it." HAHAHAHA. So true, yo!!! Especially not someone with the IQ of the average commercial watcher!
0 likes [|reply]
5 Mar 2010, 11:07
lithium layouts.
Post Count: 836
Same here. Well I'm not sure about the legalities of drug advertising in Australia, but I've never seen ads for the contraceptive pill here. The only ads we get are for OTC painkillers. I'd be inclined to think that drug advertising here is legally restricted too. I only ever heard about different types of pills from friends of mine who'd tried different ones. And yeah, doctors here don't ask 'is there a particular medication you'd like to try?' They usually just take the history/examination, and, based on that information, choose the medication that in their opinion is best suited to the patient. And of course, they are flexible and say 'if you have any problems with it, come see me and we'll try something else'. At least, that's been my experience! I have a very good doctor. =)
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 00:44
Lauren.
Post Count: 885
What is your current BC?
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 12:58
being human.
Post Count: 52
i am on ortho novum right now.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 01:29
*~Loving You~*
Post Count: 507
id ask ur doctor

If it was up 2 me - ask to use a different bc that would fit u better some ppl try a lot of diff pills 2 find the right kind
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 04:30
Jessica [Private]
Post Count: 1751
I had that reaction with Orthotricyclen Lo. I've known a few people to have that reaction as well. So I don't recommend it. But like any other pill, I've known people to be completely fine on it.

All pills treat everyone differently. You might do perfectly on Orthotricyclen Lo. Obviously people do for it to still be sold. No different than your current pill.
0 likes [|reply]
2 Mar 2010, 23:57
being human.
Post Count: 52
my doctor shouldn't be refusing my request to get on a different pill then.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 01:00
~RedFraggle~
Post Count: 2651
No, they shouldn't. And if they are you should see a different doctor.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 01:11
*Forever Changing*
Post Count: 847
Absolutely not, some pills do not work for certain people. For me, I have been told (after three birth control babies) I am resistant to hormonal birth control. Your provider needs to be flexable!
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 13:14
being human.
Post Count: 52
she is not though which is bugging me. i'm calling the office one more time today and if nothing happens, then my mom said she'd call and she wont be happy.
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 00:14
Mami 2 ♥ 1
Post Count: 361
completely aggree with redfraggle!
0 likes [|reply]
3 Mar 2010, 13:44
ICky VICky
Post Count: 78
well im on yaz, and originally i was fine on it but i can feel my mood shift dramastically since ive been on it for a year. Personally im debating what should be done cause it might be my pill might just be stress since i went though alot. But you can always get advise from people hear on what their on and look online at more info for them and then consult ur doctor so you are well aware of the kind of options for you.

Good luck.
0 likes [|reply]
8 Mar 2010, 09:02
xo heather
Post Count: 5
I took Yaz for about eighteen months, then I stopped for about six months. (I wasn't using any birth control.) Two months ago, I started using Yaz again and I became a different person. I was easily bothered and highly emotional. I stopped taking Yaz again and I am back to normal. I realized how much more stable I was when I stopped taking Yaz. Not to mention, Yaz killed my sex drive. No other pill reacted with my body in that manner, but medicines react differently with different people.
Post Reply
This thread is locked, unable to reply
Online Friends
Offline Friends